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Lamon Manuel & Analog(ue) Tape Dispenser – “Shit. Everything We Have Together is Falling Apart”

From the Chicago rap collective Tomorrow Kings, Emcee Lamon Manuel will be releasing a solo album, called Music to Feel Like Shit to, that will be produced entirely by Houston-based producer Analog(ue) Tape Dispenser. “Skies” featured fellow Tomorrow Kings member SKECH185, and it was the first single to be released (along with a music video).

The second single and music video came out two weeks ago, and it’s called “Shit. Everything We Have Together is Falling Apart“. Having never heard of Lamon before, I was I was immediately drawn into his intricate wordplay and complex rhymes on this song. Of course, before he even spoke, I was intrigued by the video of him and a woman, both looking drained of emotions, sitting calmly in separate bath tubs. Over dusty, shuffling drums, a deep bassline, gentle strings, and a woman’s laughter, Lamon raps about withering away and losing himself due to a bad breakup and the heartache of being alone. It’s drenched in emotion and vivid imagery; I had to listen to the song at least 7 times to fully absorb everything, and I really enjoyed it (not that I enjoy his pain, but I do enjoy the way he writes about it). Read more about what he had to say below, and then watch the music video. Directed by Samantha Wakefield.

Describing the song, Lamon Manuel says it’s about:
“Watching everything that matters most fall apart and not being sure what to try to save first, wondering if anything is worth saving or if there’s any hope in trying. I had no definitive answers on that when I was writing the song. I don’t really have any now. The woman I thought I’d spend the rest of my life with left me and I just wanted to feel nothing most of the time. I spent a lot of time drinking too much, getting sad literature tattoos and wandering back and forth between the north and south side of Chicago, thinking about the time I had lost investing myself in caring for someone else and now having to figure out who I was and what I wanted without her, if I wanted anything at all. I didn’t have many songs to listen to to probably score what I was experiencing so I ended up writing some. And all of this happened while I was being Black.”

PURCHASE

Written By: Tiffany B.

Music and arts journalist, music curator, and co-boss babe of CrayonBeats since 2008! I've published 3,000+ posts consisting of new music, reviews, and interviews. I also do half of everything of CrayonBeats Magazine, so get familiar with our issues! Aside from being a music aficionado, I'm also a freelance artist/illustrator, a creative soul, a natural born lover, a comic book reader, an optimist, and a bit of a weirdo. I hate writing bios about myself, so see ya.